Excellent Montessori School

Why we chose Excellent Montessori

Every parent wants their child to receive the best education possible. For us, that meant sending our son to a Montessori school. While we did look into sending him to a traditional preschool, we immediately fell in love with Excellent Montessori School and knew right away that it would be the best fit for our family for a few reasons.

1. Curriculum

While most preschools teach language arts and mathematics, the Montessori curriculum also adds lessons in practical life skills, sensory awareness and cultural education. Children learn how to be independent and do tasks such as pouring their own drinks and tying their own shoes. They learn using all five senses, instead of just sitting doing worksheets. They also learn about different cultures through lessons in geography, zoology and the arts. In fact, I was surprised that my son pointed out all the provincial flags in Canada a few days ago when I was browsing a kids guide to province   web page.

2. Philosophy

Unlike traditional preschools, where kids are put on structured schedules and pressured into meeting arbitrary standards from the first day, Montessori preschools let children learn through play and discovery. The teacher's job is not to give knowledge; it is to guide children into discovering that knowledge themselves through play. Toys and instructional materials are placed around the room and the children have the freedom to play and learn as they please. Children work at their own pace as they decide what they will learn each day based on their unique interests and skills.

3. Mixed-age Classrooms

One feature of the Montessori program I especially love is their use of the multi-age classroom. My son's class is made of children between age two and half to age six. Last year, when he was the youngest, he had several older children who were able to show him the ropes of preschool. Because he learned from his peers, I believe he caught onto various skills, especially social skills, faster. In two years, he will be the oldest in his CASA class and it will be his turn to impart his knowledge to the younger boys and girls in his class. As he teaches the younger kids, he will reinforce his own knowledge of the skills.

4. Non-competitive Environment

Another great feature of a Montessori education is the non-competitive environment. In traditional schools, students are expected and pressured to be at a certain point in their development by a certain time. If a child is behind in one area, he knows he is behind and this can lead to him feeling stupid or incapable. With a Montessori education, children are measured only against themselves. They are not made to feel inferior for what they have not yet learned, but are praised for what they have.

Unfortunately, the Montessori schools here only go through grade seven at our place. I would love for my son to be able to attend a Montessori school for his whole education, but he will eventually attend a traditional school. I am confident, however, that his time in the Montessori program will leave him well-prepared for the future.


Famous Montessori Graduates

Letters from former students

Excellent Montessori © Montessori School | Childcare

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Montessori education offers an unique experience designed to help your child maximize her potential; an educational environment that is purposefully designed to meet her unique developmental needs and adults who are specifically trained to observe and put her in touch with exactly what she needs at that very moment to learn.


A school is a group of people who come together with a common purpose; education is the experience that your child has with these people. At Excellent Montessori, we work diligently to provide a positive and formative experience that will serve her now and for the rest of her life.


The conventional educational system was designed during the industrial revolution, when the masses moved into urban areas to work in factories.


They created an effective method of training the following generations of factory workers. Children were instructed to memorize and regurgitate facts – to stop working when the bell rings – to sit in nice, neat rows of desks and ask for permissio
n to move. It is no longer relevant in our modern culture.


Today, successful people work on projects not factory lines. They are rewarded for creating things rather than following orders. And, they are expected to adapt quickly to change within their profession, rather than working at the same job for 50 years. As we peek into the uncertain future of the 21st century, AMI Montessori programs offer a safe harbor for parents: a research-based method that has been proven to develop some of the brightest minds of our times and is well positioned to develop the movers and shakers of tomorrow.

Who is Dr. Maria Montessori

Montessori Student at Work

Take the tour and see the difference

   Visiting our Montessori School is truly an unique  experience.  From the moment you walk in  you know there is something special going on  here.  After speaking with the Admissions   Director you will be fully informed about the  Montessori teaching approach. After taking  the tour you will see the teaching approach  at work.  It’s like a symphony of learners  making beautiful music.

Maria Montessori was the first woman to practice medicine in Italy. A scholar of biology, psychiatry, anthropology, and medicine, she graduated from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Rome in 1896. As a physician, Dr. Montessori was in touch with young children and became profoundly interested in their development. Through careful and exhaustive scrutiny, she realized that children construct their own personalities as they interact with their environment. She also observed the manner in which they learned as they spontaneously chose and worked with the auto didactic materials she provided.

She studied children of all races and cultures in many countries around the world, soon seeing the universality of the laws of human development. She continued her observations throughout her life, widening and deepening her understanding until her death in 1952. Also a devoted humanitarian, she was three-times nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize for her advocacy efforts toward a more peaceful humanity.